Study finds that mental health treatment improves heart disease outcomes

A recent study published in the Journal of the American Heart Association suggests that addressing mental health conditions is crucial for better outcomes for heart disease patients. Researchers at Ohio State University examined over 1,500 subjects with known heart disease and found that those who received medication and psychotherapy for anxiety or depression were less likely to be readmitted to the hospital or visit an emergency room. This highlights the importance of considering mental health when it comes to managing overall health, including heart disease.

Physical and mental health are closely linked, with anxiety and depression often leading to poor sleep, restlessness, hopelessness, inactivity, substance use, and poor diet choices. These factors can either cause chronic health conditions or worsen existing ones. By addressing mental health conditions, we can positively impact overall health outcomes.

Dr. Mallika Marshall is an Emmy-award-winning journalist and practicing physician board-certified in Internal Medicine and Pediatrics, serving on staff at Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital. She works on the frontlines caring for patients with COVID-19 at MGH Chelsea Urgent Care and the MGH Revere Health Center. Dr. Marshall is also a host and contributing editor for Harvard Health Publications.

The study emphasizes that treating mental health conditions could lead to better outcomes for heart disease patients by reducing their chances of being readmitted to the hospital or visiting an emergency room due to anxiety or depression symptoms.

Anxiety and depression are not uncommon among people who have been diagnosed with heart disease. These mental health conditions can have a significant impact on physical health as they can lead to poor sleep patterns, lack of exercise, unhealthy eating habits, substance abuse, which can increase the risk of developing chronic diseases such as diabetes or hypertension.

Therefore, it’s essential to address any underlying mental health issues when managing heart disease effectively. Treating these conditions can help individuals manage their symptoms better and reduce their risk of complications.

In conclusion, treating mental health conditions could significantly improve overall outcomes for heart disease patients by reducing their chances of being readmitted to hospitals or visiting emergency rooms due to anxiety or depression symptoms.

Overall physical and mental health are closely intertwined when it comes to managing overall wellness effectively. By addressing any underlying mental health issues alongside physical treatments such as medication management and lifestyle changes such as exercise and nutrition plans, individuals can achieve optimal outcomes while living with a chronic condition like heart disease.

By Riley Johnson

As a content writer at newsmol.com, I dive into the depths of information to craft compelling stories that captivate and inform readers. With a keen eye for detail and a passion for storytelling, I strive to create engaging content that resonates with our audience. Whether it's breaking news, in-depth features, or thought-provoking opinion pieces, I am dedicated to delivering high-quality, informative content that keeps readers coming back for more. My goal is to bring a fresh perspective to every article I write and to make a meaningful impact through the power of words.

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